Hawkeye E-2c Aircraft Parts

End item NSN parts page 1 of 62
Part Number
NSN
NIIN
0-300-271-04 Loop Clamp
014588642
0-330-001-016 Electrical Solenoid
012902320
0-64 Optoelectronic Display
010849109
0000980 Electrical Receptacle Connector
004057661
000154-0645-01 Electromagnetic Relay
005081815
0007212 Electrical Receptacle Connector
013922802
0007482 Electrical Receptacle Connector
013922802
00154-0645-01 Electromagnetic Relay
005081815
00154-0645-1 Electromagnetic Relay
005081815
00166746 Preformed Hose
005557792
004-839 Electrical Special Purpose Cable
009578519
004-840 Electrical Special Purpose Cable
009578519
005-960 Direct Current Motor
011207916
005354 Reactor
007025613
00606296015447 Electrical Plug Connector
000621148
006811-1 Light Lens
014199820
006811-15 Light Lens
014201851
008-387 Control Transformer Synchro
000112994
009-1627-00 Vaneaxial Fan
000431981
009-1627-000 Vaneaxial Fan
000431981
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Aircraft, Hawkeye E-2c

Picture of Hawkeye E-2c Aircraft

The Northrop Grumman E-2 Hawkeye is an American all-weather, carrier-capable tactical airborne early warning (AEW) aircraft. This twin-turboprop aircraft was designed and developed during the late 1950s and early 1960s by the Grumman Aircraft Company for the United States Navy as a replacement for the earlier, piston-engined E-1 Tracer, which was rapidly becoming obsolete. The aircraft's performance has been upgraded with the E-2B, and E-2C versions, where most of the changes were made to the radar and radio communications due to advances in electronic integrated circuits and other electronics. The fourth major version of the Hawkeye is the E-2D, which first flew in 2007. The E-2 was the first aircraft designed specifically for its role, as opposed to a modification of an existing airframe, such as the Boeing E-3 Sentry. Variants of the Hawkeye have been in continuous production since 1960, giving it the longest production run of any carrier-based aircraft.

The E-2 also received the nickname "Super Fudd" because it replaced the E-1 Tracer "Willy Fudd". In recent decades, the E-2 has been commonly referred to as the "Hummer" because of the distinctive sounds of its turboprop engines, quite unlike that of turbojet and turbofan jet engines. In addition to U.S. Navy service, smaller numbers of E-2s have been sold to the armed forces of Egypt, France, Israel, Japan, Mexico, Singapore and Taiwan.

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