C 135 Stratolifter Parts

End item NSN parts page 1 of 7
Part Number
NSN
NIIN
10-160175-14B Cable Conduit
011139427
10-2550-7 Metallic Hose Assembly
000207480
10-30015-508 Cable Conduit
011139427
10-60452-20 Metallic Hose Assembly
011450000
10-61329-15 Electric Windshield Wiper Motor
004184481
1013 Aircraft Boarding Ladder
009087965
102568 Metallic Hose Assembly
000207480
1200807-18 Metallic Hose Assembly
000207480
1241393-16-0165 Nonmetallic Hose Assembly
007637104
1566-4 Entry Ladder Rung
010215498
1566-5 Air Structural Component Support
011904932
1566-6 Air Structural Component Support
011904933
1566-7 Air Structural Component Support
010053770
1566-9 Crew Entry Ladder Cap
008595680
1624 Aircraft Boarding Ladder
009087965
17000-315 Cable Assembly
011640421
17321-0-160 Thermostatic Switch
010824517
1907G24D Union Nut
005369578
2313M-21-5 Electric Windshield Wiper Motor
004184481
3-64320 Aircraft Structural Plate
002108130
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C 135 Stratolifter

Picture of C 135 Stratolifter

The Boeing C-135 Stratolifter is a transport aircraft derived from the prototype Boeing 367-80 jet airliner (also the basis for the 707) in the early 1950s. It has a narrower fuselage and is shorter than the 707. Boeing gave the aircraft the internal designation of Model 717. Since the first one was built in August 1956, the C-135 and its variants have been a fixture of the United States Air Force.

A large majority of the 820 units were developed as KC-135A Stratotankers for mid-air refueling. However, they have also performed numerous transport and special-duty functions. Forty-five base-model aircraft were built as C-135A or C-135B transports with the tanking equipment excluded. As is the case with the KC-135, the C-135 is also recognized as the Model 717 by Boeing.

Fifteen C-135As, powered by Pratt & Whitney J57 turbojets, were built. In later years, almost all were upgraded with Pratt & Whitney TF33 turbofan engines and wide-span tail planes, and were re-designated C-135E. Most were converted to various special roles, including airborne command posts, missile-tracking platforms, and VIP transports, and were withdrawn throughout the 1990s.

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